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How to Make Preserved Lemons

Preserved-Lemons-1-cropped-lighter
Ingredients
  • 3 Meyer lemons (or Eureka, Lisbon, etc, organic recommended) per pint-sized jar
  • 5-6 teaspoons salt
  • An extra lemon for juicing
  • Water that has been boiled and cooled (sterile)
Instructions
  1. You can make however many preserved lemons you like, but roughly 3 will fit per pint-sized jar.
  2. Thoroughly clean the lemons. Organic is recommended. If you can’t find organic, let the lemons sit in some vinegar water for a few minutes, then rinse.
  3. Trim the nubs off both ends of each lemon. Quarter each lemon, slicing them down just over Ā¾ of the way to leave the slices attached at the end.
  4. Put one teaspoon of salt into the cavity of each lemon.
  5. Place one teaspoon salt into the bottom of the jar. Put a lemon in the jar, cut-side down, pressing firmly to squish out the lemon juice. Put a teaspoon of salt on top of the lemon. Firmly press the second lemon down on top of the first lemon. Repeat with the third lemon, pressing down firmly. Add a teaspoon of salt on top of the lemon.
  6. The jar should be halfway full with lemon juice. If needed, squeeze some additional lemon juice into the jar to bring it to the halfway point. Don’t waste that lemon; slice it and stuff the slices into the jar. Pour the boiled/cooled water into the jar to fill it to the top.
  7. Screw the lid on and let it sit at room temperature for 3 days, shaking it and rotating the jar upside-down/right-side up a few times per day. After 3 days transfer the jars to the refrigerator and let them sit for at least 3 weeks before using. Store in the fridge, will keep for at least 6 months (see Note).
Notes
* In most countries preserved lemons are not stored in the refrigerator, they’re simply kept in a cool, dark place. I’ve added the recommendation to store in the fridge based on USDA guidelines. Store them according to your own preference.
* Whatever dish you use them in, discard the pulp (it’s the peel that is used) and thoroughly wash the peel to remove excess salt.
Thanks to Kimberly Killebrew, of The Daring Gourmet: